LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.0

Help for LM_NET Archives


LM_NET Archives

LM_NET Archives


LM_NET@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

LM_NET Home

LM_NET Home

LM_NET  August 2018

LM_NET August 2018

Subject:

HIT: student-driven inquiry, essential questions

From:

Daniel Gattuso <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Daniel Gattuso <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Wed, 8 Aug 2018 08:02:05 -0400

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (232 lines)

All,

Here's the info:

I second Jamie McKenzie and his work - he’s got an excellent toolkit that
helps with question starters and understanding the many kinds of question
there are.  I’ve found that it’s easy to ask the who, what, when, where,
how questions.. it helps to help students think about what if, how might,
what might have...

I also will say that IMHO  the go-to strategy  - and it’s not really a
strategy, it’s more of a thinking process - is the QFT from the Right
Question Institute. Using it with any audience from little kids to adults
allows the ideas to flow, gives a focus to any task, and helps to sort out
those questions that need factual answers (“dig and dive”) in order to gain
knowledge and a context, and those that will help to engage a path for
discovery. I’ve used QFT with elementary and college students and have
always found the process to help open the doors of inquiry in ways that no
other process has. Once they know the process  you don’t have to use the
formal process each time.

I agree also with the idea that teachers want to center on a product
because it’s easy to assess.  But I claim that one can easily assess along
the way (assess notes, assess citations, assess claims and the arguments as
they are being built through quizzes, journals, reflection writing ,etc)
AND this makes it easier to actually assess the product from a design and
presentation view.

 If you don’t let the students even go to the computer to design the
infographic, or write the paper, or create their powerpoint until you’ve
checked - and given a passing grade to - those notes, quizzes, and
journals, pathfinders or a proposal (vs a rough draft) then you’ll know
that after you’ve given them the nod that they’ve gotten a “c” on the work
…then they can “up” the grade by presenting their claim or completing their
product in a way that engages you and the class and shows off the work /
gives the evidence to the claims, meets all the criteria of good work,
etc.

You can set design criteria, and grade the product without having to worry
about  if they did “good history or good science”  - because, you know they
did it.

__________________________________________________________________________

Teaching students how to question and ask the right questions in a
particular situation is the most essential skill we can teach them, IMO.
For only if we have the question can we find or develop the most
appropriate answer or solution.

We have to remember that our students are still very young, are only
beginning to move from the concrete operations stage of the here and now
and what they can see, touch, taste and feel and into the more abstract
world of what if.  As teachers we have a critical role in modelling
questions for them so they can pose questions as well as answer them - we
can't just expect them to do it by themselves. So we need to give them lots
of opportunities to practise posing questions through looking at objects,
pictures and so forth, even if the questions don't necessarily lead to
answers. In this case the question is more important than the answer.

Having decided whether they need to investigate, explain, describe, analyse
or persuade, I've always got my students to start with two key questions...

What do I already know about the topic/issue?

What more do I need to find out?

That way they are making connections between the known and unknown so there
is engagement and a bridge to cross, but they aren't wasting time
investigating stuff they already know.

My go-to person was always Jamie Mackenzie http://questioning.org/ which
has a video about his questioning toolkit (in print at
http://questioning.org/Q7/toolkit.html)

The best resource I can suggest is to investigate Guided Inquiry (lots of
images of the model online to start your thinking); go to Guided Inquiry
Design https://guidedinquirydesign.com/gid/ and get Guided Inquiry Design®:
A Framework for Inquiry in Your School
Book by Ann K. Caspari, Carol Kuhlthau, and Leslie K. Maniotes.  It's a
process that has grown out of Kuhlthau's research into information literacy
which differs from others' because she added the affective domain to her
model.  She acknowledged that when presented with something new we feel
confused and confronted, even overwhelmed,  but with guidance and support
we can work our way through to a solution.

I know many teachers and administrators like to focus on the product
because it overtly is assessable against a rubric and so a grade can be
given, IMO the process is more important than the product because it is the
process that the student follows that can be transferred to new learning
situations.  Identifying and defining the initial problem, whether
self-imposed or set by someone or circumstance, using the questions that
form a core part of any instructional model (such as those is my version of
the Information Literacy Process
http://500hats.edublogs.org/information-literacy-process/ is at the core,
and at the core of that is the ability to ask quality questions - which
generally lead to further questions.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


He QFT is super easy to learn and follow with a little guidance to start.
Question Formulation Technique. Easy to find online.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

I use a process that my librarian used with my English classes back when I
taught in a high school. I have found that it works at the middle school
level as well. I created a graphic organizer that has students narrow their
research topic and develop a research question by answering the following
questions:



   1. What subject areas or topics are you interested in? (e.g. Civil War,
   pandas, Titanic, etc.)
   2. Choose one that you want to focus on (e.g. Titanic)
   3. What questions do you have about this topic? (or What do I want to
   know/learn about the topic?) (list 2-3 questions)
   4. Choose one question to focus on - this is your research question


Then the teacher and I move around the room and make sure each question is
researchable and is not a yes/no/data specific question (e.g. "When did the
Titanic sink" is too data specific). This step is guided by what the
purpose of the research is, but in our case the purpose is usually for
students to write a page or two based on the research.


There is also a space on the graphic organizer for "presearch" - if a
student needs to skim resources to develop an interest in a particular
topic we encourage them to record the sources in case they can use them
during their focused research.


I change up this wording on the graphic organizer depending on the level of
students and the purpose of their research, but the steps of narrowing down
the topic to a research question are the same.


__________________________________________________


Hi Daniel, I am aware of many models of inquiry but my favorite is Points
of Inquiry:  https://bctla.ca/resources/point-of-inquiry/
The Points of Inquiry | BC Teacher-Librarians' Association
<https://bctla.ca/resources/point-of-inquiry/>
bctla.ca
The Points of Inquiry: Inquiry-based Learning for Classroom and School
Libraries (2011) Integration of Technology screencast Top Ten Research
Skills for University Students Note: Further French translation of the
documents is planned.



The Big6 model is widely used as well: https://libguides.ops.org/big6
LibGuides: Big 6+ Inquiry Process: Big 6+ Inquiry
<https://libguides.ops.org/big6>
libguides.ops.org
LibGuides: Big 6+ Inquiry Process: Big 6+ Inquiry

I have a high school colleague whose entire school has adopted the Global
Digital Citizen's Solution Fluency Model (see attached).


Here's a quick video that uses a Hogwarts analogy to explain different ways
that inquiry models are implemented.

https://youtu.be/QlwkerwaV2E


And an infographic that helps us understand the inquiry continuum (from
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/DUpf8mbZQx6p74Kp3mTM_hzvMEu3vJ6-niDeguAa2j2-7pEH5hxz3Xgdxs-U8378ZrI2kAyje2NmmjeY8EDAoC2SZKhKEY4AGJJq6O_1gtBbblsbZFNTAYi4Y5PD9wm3hVXJWeEH
)




Also check out Kuhlthau's Guided Inquiry (
http://wp.comminfo.rutgers.edu/ckuhlthau/guided-inquiry-design/); Research
Quest (
www.sd43.bc.ca/school/heritagewoods/.../The%20Research%20Quest%20Model.ppt
<https://www.google.com/search?safe=strict&client=safari&rls=en&ei=aAdnW_7mH_O70PEPnOS3gAU&q=research+quest+inqiury+mideol&oq=research+quest+inqiury+mideol&gs_l=psy-ab.3..33i160k1l2.7923.9919.0.10101.15.13.0.0.0.0.283.1165.4j2j2.8.0....0...1c.1.64.psy-ab..7.8.1163...0j0i67k1j0i22i30k1j33i21k1.0.YrlFAHTxjYg#>

   1.
   <http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:S55RGCqzKbcJ:www.sd43.bc.ca/school/heritagewoods/ProgramsServices/Library/Documents/The%2520Research%2520Quest%2520Model.ppt+&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca&client=safari>
   2.
   <https://www.google.com/search?safe=strict&client=safari&rls=en&q=related:www.sd43.bc.ca/school/heritagewoods/ProgramsServices/Library/Documents/The%2520Research%2520Quest%2520Model.ppt+research+quest+inquiry+model&tbo=1&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwie_tTLjdbcAhVVHDQIHaFiBpAQHzAAegQIARAG>

) and Stripling and Pitts (http://eduscapes.com/infooriginal/pitts.html)

Guided Inquiry Design | Carol Kuhlthau - Rutgers University
<http://wp.comminfo.rutgers.edu/ckuhlthau/guided-inquiry-design/>
wp.comminfo.rutgers.edu
Kuhlthau, Maniotes, and Caspari 2012. From the ISP to Guided Inquiry
Design. The ISP model describes what students’ experience in the phases of
the inquiry process.


Models: Stripling and Pitts Research Process Model
<http://eduscapes.com/infooriginal/pitts.html>
eduscapes.com
Stripling and Pitts Research Process Model. The late 1980s was a time when
many librarians and educators were discussing the importance of information
skills.

Enjoy!


Yours,


Dan Gattuso

Library Media Specialist, Maryvale Intermediate and Middle Schools

--------------------------------------------------------------------
Please note: All LM_NET postings are protected by copyright law.
  You can prevent most e-mail filters from deleting LM_NET postings
  by adding [log in to unmask] to your e-mail address book.
To change your LM_NET status,  send a message to: [log in to unmask]  (not to [log in to unmask])
In the body of the message write the command that is appropriate to your request:
1) SIGNOFF LM_NET          (this will remove you from the list)
2) SET LM_NET NOMAIL    (this will suspend mail delivery, but will not remove you from the list)
3) SET LM_NET MAIL         (this will resume mail delivery)
4) SET LM_NET DIGEST     (this will group individual posts into several daily messages)

 * To contact an LM_NET Moderator:  [log in to unmask]
 * LM_NET Help & Information: http://www.lm-net.info/
 * LM_NET Archive: http://lmnet-archive.iis.syr.edu/

--------------------------------------------------------------------

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LISTSERV.SYR.EDU

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager